The story of a neologism in Italian language invented by an eight years old student and pushed by social networks.

A new word has just entered in the Italian language. It was invented by a 8 years old child, Matteo, during the Italian lesson, in an exercise on adjectives. The story was a trend topics for a couple of days and it even peeked out in international news.
To cut it short: to describe a flower, the student used the adjective “petaloso” to mean that it’s full of petals, but the word doesn’t (didn’t!) exist in Italian. His teacher marked it as a mistake, but the word is constructed by adding to the word “petalo” (petal) the suffix “-oso” meaning full of. The teacher sent it for an evaluation to the Accademia della Crusca, the Italian National Institution of Language. Which, surprisingly (or not?) answered with a letter explaining to Matteo that the word grammatically made sense and it was clear and comprehensible.

Nevertheless, to become a word of Italian language it must be understood and used by a great number of people in many sentences.