language

Italian language has a new word, thanks to internet. Or not?

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The story of a neologism in Italian language invented by an eight years old student and pushed by social networks.

A new word has just entered in the Italian language. It was invented by a 8 years old child, Matteo, during the Italian lesson, in an exercise on adjectives. The story was a trend topics for a couple of days and it even peeked out in international news.
To cut it short: to describe a flower, the student used the adjective “petaloso” to mean that it’s full of petals, but the word doesn’t (didn’t!) exist in Italian. His teacher marked it as a mistake, but the word is constructed by adding to the word “petalo” (petal) the suffix “-oso” meaning full of. The teacher sent it for an evaluation to the Accademia della Crusca, the Italian National Institution of Language. Which, surprisingly (or not?) answered with a letter explaining to Matteo that the word grammatically made sense and it was clear and comprehensible.

Nevertheless, to become a word of Italian language it must be understood and used by a great number of people in many sentences.

food

Ten Italian food Instagram accounts you want to follow

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Ten Italian food Instagram profiles to get inspired for your dinner (or lunch, or breakfast…)

If you like cooking Italian food Instagram is a great resource. In Italy, as everywhere, there’s plenty of food blogs. It’s enough you have a look to the website of the Italian food blog association to have an idea of what the web offers. Moreover, most of these blogs are in Italian, which makes them less useful for an English speaking audience.
My personal opinion is that what makes a food blog really outstanding are original and stylish photographs. That’s why I’m summarizing here my favourite foodie Instagram profiles. I’m often too lazy to cook something new, but sometimes a nice photo inspires me to try. Sometimes it just makes me hungry!

people

Should you see the movie “Italy in a day”?

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You want to better understand Italy and Italians, for any reason. Should you see the movie “Italy in a day”?

Italy in a day has been claimed to be the first experiment in Italy of social filming. On 26th October 2013 Italian were asked to use their smartphones and cameras to record one day in their life. The idea was to build a collective film that would be directed by Oscar prize-winner Gabriele Salvatores.

Nearly a year later, on 23rd September 2014 the documentary was showed in cinemas and on 27th September it was broadcasted by the national TV.

books, language, people

An unexpected reason to learn Italian

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Are you looking for another reason to learn Italian? Check the experience of these two famous writers.

There’s more than a reason to learn Italian. You might want to read Italian literature, to watch Italian movies, to read recepies or to understand lyrics in operas. It’s also the most similar to Latin than any other romance language as French, Spanish and Portuguese. Moreover about 60 % of English words derive from Latin. Do you need another reason?

Reason to learn Italian

Learn Italian – cover of Italian version of the Lowland

I have recently read two books by two brilliant female writers: Ghana must go by Taiye Selasi and The Lowland by Jumpa Lahiri.

There are many similarities between these two amazing women. They both grew up on the border between of two cultures. They both write about how to manage this difficult balance.

And they have another thing in common: they both speak Italian.

What’s their reason to learn Italian?

food

Looking for the best soup recipe: a tour of Italy in five soups.

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Five regional Italian soups recipes to warm your winter.

If I had to choose one example of most typical Italian I would say: soup. So I collected the best soup recipes (or the easiest) I found on the web for five traditional Italian soups. You might be surprised I’m not talking pizza and pasta, but I find just one common factor in real traditional Italian food. It’s poor. Not many decades ago, meat was not affordable to everybody and also the richest ate it only on Sundays. Most of the people counted on the production of their fields and gardens or on fish and mussels they could collect if they lived next to the sea. And certainly they did not throw away any food, finding the most inventive ways to reuse leftovers.

Looking for the best soup recipe: a tour of Italy in five soups.

one of the best soup recipes, served in a jar at Eataly

Don’t forget that some of the most iconic Italian food has a quite recent origin. Think about pizza: flat breads with on the top are common in all the Mediterranean, but pizza as we know it couldn’t exists before VXI century, simply because tomatoes were not available in Europe before the discovery of America. And even though pizza certainly had existed for centuries, it was only in 1889 that a pizza with tomato, mozzarella and basil, red white and green as the Italian flag, was dedicated to Margherita of Savoy, Queen of Italy. And the beloved Tiramisù? Apart of some legends about its origin, it has appeared in the cooking books only in the Eighties.

Soups represents better than any other the spirit of Italian food and maybe of the Med diet.

They are healthy and comfort especially in winter. A treat when outside is cold and you had a bad day.

Here’s a tour of Italy in five soups.